artfront galleries presents a provocative one man show by serron

Artfront Galleries is proud to present a provocative one-man show by local Newark artist Serron. Yes the title contains a word fraught with layers of history and meaning. Before you judge read Serron’s Artist Statement to gain insight into his motivation. Most of all come with an open mind and be prepared to be challenged.

Serron’s Artist Statement

The idea of All the Scared Niggers are Dead exists in a very literal sense, dating back to an era where the “slave mentality” was birthed in order to create the quintessential docile and obedient negro. Along with subservience, fear was instilled from birth as a method of control to keep the slave completely dependent and in a position of unconditional servitude. Throughout history, civil unrest boiled over into monumental movements that began pushing for the eradication of unjust laws which continued to deny Black people equal education, civil, and basic human rights.

These monumental movements created a shift in the culture that became rooted in celebrating and empowering the Black community. The advent of Hip Hop further encouraged a change in the collective state of mind, emphatically proclaiming there is power in being Black. Groups like X Clan and Public Enemy burst onto the scene invigorating a sense of self-regard in the youth—a far cry from the days when Blacks hung their heads low out of shame or fear of severe repercussions from eye-contact or other “disobedient” behavior towards whites.

“The time for running has come to an end. You tell them white folk in Mississippi that all the scared niggers are dead!” Serron’s latest collection of work is a call to action—directly quoting late Civil Rights Movement leader, Stokely Carmichael. It’s evoking a complex and painful history as a means of remembrance in order to thrust the movement for equality forward. According to the artist, “I’m not afraid to say all the scared niggers are dead…I cant be concerned with anybody’s opinion about the title. If you’re offended or feel some type of discomfort, that’s fine. That means I’ve done my job.”

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